Welcome to our blog

Grooming your dog made simple

Grooming can be done anywhere in the house. It’s best to pick an area where your dog knows it’s grooming time and somewhere from where they can take themselves off if they have had enough (especially puppies). You should never force your dog to be groomed but just take one step at a time until they feel relaxed and secure for the whole time you are grooming them.
Invest in a good brush. There is plenty of brushes you can choose from. Here are a few and some of their uses.

Types of Brushes

Slicker Brush

This type of brush works with all coat types. It has a flat or curved head with rows of thin wire pins, which remove loose fur and helps detangle.

Bristle Brush

This brush is best for doggies with short or wiry coats. The bristles remove debris and leaves a nice shine.

Furminator

This handy de-shredding tool has a toothed metal comb. This works best on flat, short, combination, heavy and double coats. The comb can help reduce shedding. It is designed to reach through their topcoat and safely remove loose hair and undercoat without damaging your pet’s coat or cutting their skin. The Furminator Undercoat de-Shedding Tool should not be used on non-shedding breeds or on pets with particularly sensitive skin. Please consult a vet if you are unsure if your pet has an undercoat.
Ideally the furminator should be used 1-2 times a week for 10-20 minutes a session. Make sure your dog is free from matts before using.

Grooming your dog

You should groom your dog regularly together with bathing which will keep your dog’s coat shiny and clean. We recommend most dogs should be bathed every 6 weeks, unless your dog is one of those ones where you just can’t come back from a walk without them being dirty, inwhich case we recommend just rinsing and only washing the dirtiest parts.
Be careful not to bath too often as this can strip the natural oils out of the coat.
Before any bathing, make sure all matts are brushed out before getting them wet as this can cause more matting and will be harder to brush out afterwards, making it most uncomfortable for your dog.

Plenty of Treats

When first introducing grooming to a dog you should go at their pace. Give them plenty of love, cuddles and treats as you introduce new grooming tools to them and eventually the bathing and drying.
You can start by firstly getting your dog used to you touching all areas of their body such as their ears, eyes, tail and legs. A good time to softly rub your hands over your dog is when they are lying alseep next to you or during cuddling. At first use nice gentle soft circles over the body.
If your dog shows signs of any stress or anything other than being completely relaxed (the main goal throughout grooming) then you should retract to earlier stages and take smaller steps.
Allow your dog to first smell the brush so they get used to it, then slowly using the back of the brush, just go down their back and do that until they are comfortable with it, then start brushing. Using short strokes and reward your dog as you go. You can use the same process with combs and nail clippers.

Nail Clippers

It is a good idea to get your dog used to you touching their feet. Once they are used to that hold up a pair of nail trimmers next to their paws without clipping, then give them a treat. This will get your dog used to the nail clippers.

Hair Dryers

Switch on the dryer at low speed and let your dog get used to the sound before you go near them with it. This won’t startle them so much when it comes to the actual drying. Slowly bring the dryer closer to your dog until they are comfortable and you can use it on them without any fuss.
Treats are important throughout the introduction of grooming.
It can be a long process to introduce a dog to grooming (especially puppies) and they will soon tell you at each stage when they have had enough. You can start with a 10 minute session each day and slowly increase until you can do a full groom without any sign of stress.
Constantly brushing your dog every day is also good for them. Try and get them used to as many sights and sounds as possible.
Grooming can start as early as 12-16 weeks. The earlier the better so your dog gets used to grooming from an early age.
Happy Grooming!

Buy great smelling dog sprays and shampoos

All material on this website is copyright© B.O.S Naturals, all rights reserved.
Designed and produced by a|s|t marketing, design & consulting